Partnerships and Friends of IAHA

Partnerships

Australian Allied Health Forum (AAHF)

IAHA is part of the Australian Allied Health Forum (AAHF), a collaborative of representatives from allied health organisations who work together on issues of national importance to the allied health professions and the Australian public. Click here for an overview of AAHF and it’s shared priorities for 2014-15.

AAHF aims to contribute to Australian Government policies in relationship to allied health services across the broad range of sectors in which they operate; allied health workforce development (including education and training); and progressing allied health priorities.

Joining IAHA as founding members of the Australian Allied Health Forum are Allied Health Professions Australia (AHPA) – the peak body representing and advocating for the role of allied health professions in Australia; National Allied Health Advisors Committee (NAHAC) – national network of allied health advisors with state/territory level responsibility for the development of allied health workforce and clinical service development in health and human services; and Services for Australian Rural and Remote Allied Health (SARRAH) – nationally recognised as a peak body representing rural and remote allied health professionals.

 

Collaboration Agreement

IAHA PVC Collaboration

Australian Council of Pro-Vice-Chancellors and Deans of Health Sciences 

The second Collaboration Agreement between Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) and Australian Council of Pro-Vice-Chancellors and Deans of Health Sciences (ACPDHS) was signed at the 2015 IAHA National Conference Welcome Event on 30 November 2015 on the Daintree’s Pool Deck, Pullman Cairns International . Both organisations highlighted that they remain committed and responsive to the allied health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This includes increasing the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people participating in the allied health workforce, fostering a community centred and priority driven allied health research agenda for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, and strengthening the cultural competence of allied health graduates.

The first Collaboration Agreement between Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) and the Australian Council of Pro-Vice-Chancellors and Deans of Health Sciences (ACPDHS) was signed on 25 November 2013 at the IAHA 2013 national conference, held at the Hilton Adelaide. Click here to view the first agreement.
 

Mount Isa Centre for Rural and Remote Health

IAHA and MICRRH are committed and responsive to the allied health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This includes increasing the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people participating in the allied health workforce, fostering a community centred and priority driven allied health research agenda for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, and strengthening the cultural competence of allied health graduates.

IAHA and MICRRH assert that in order to positively affect the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have the right “to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health” as per Article 24(2) of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (the Declaration). This right is in addition to the basic right to health for all described within the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948);
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives and knowledge must be privileged across teaching and research activities;
  • Allied health education providers have a responsibility to ensure their graduates attain the necessary skills, knowledge and attitudes that will enable them to deliver culturally responsive care. This includes providing clinical experiences that expose them to the unique needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations and remote and regional Australia; and
  • The current and future allied health workforce must be both culturally responsive to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and clinically competent

Click here to view an overview of the Collaboration Agreement.

Statement of Intent

DSC_1129_web01Statement of Intent between Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA), Allied Health Professions Australia (AHPA) and its Member Organisations and Affiliates

Click here to view the signed statement of intent.

Closing the Gap on life expectancy, educational achievement and employment opportunities between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians is at the heart of an historic agreement that was signed by 24 national allied health organisations at Parliament House 20 March 2014.

The Statement of Intent between Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA), Allied Health Professions Australia (AHPA) and its Member Organisations and Affiliates aims to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.

“On this day, Close the Gap Day, we are proud to witness so many national allied health professional organisations commit to this vital issue,” said IAHA Chairperson Faye McMillan. “If there are other allied health organisations out there who would like to join us in the future and make their own commitment, we would actively welcome them.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have the right to equitably access allied health services that are available, affordable, acceptable and appropriate, provided by professionals who are both culturally responsive and clinically competent.

“Australia has around 120,000 practising allied health professionals, we estimate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health professionals to be less than 2% of that workforce.

“In addition to increasing the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people participating in the allied health workforce, we are committed to strengthening the cultural responsiveness of all allied health students and graduates.”

The agreement includes commitments to:

  • contributing to comprehensive, long-term plans of action, that are targeted to need, evidence-based and capable of addressing the existing inequities in health services, in order to achieve equality of health status and life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians by 2030.
  • advocating for culturally responsive health care services and health infrastructure for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples which are capable of bridging the gaps in health standards by 2018.
  • supporting the full participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their representatives in all aspects of addressing their health needs.
  • building on the evidence base and supporting what works in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, especially in allied health services, and relevant international experience.
  • encouraging improved access to, and outcomes from, allied health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in all settings.
  • respecting and promoting the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, including by advocating that health services are available, appropriate, accessible, affordable and good quality.

Signatories of this Statement of Intent are:
Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA), Allied Health Professions Australia (AHPA), Australian Association of Social Workers, Australian Music Therapy Association, Australian & NZ College of Perfusionists, Australian Osteopathic Association, Australian Orthotic Prosthetic Association, Australian Physiotherapy Association, Australasian Podiatry Council, Australian Psychological Society, Audiology Australia, Australian Sonographers Association, Australasian Society of Genetic Counsellors, Chiropractors’ Association of Australia, Dietitians Association of Australia, Exercise & Sports Science Australia, Orthoptics Australia, Occupational Therapy Australia, Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia, Speech Pathology Australia, Australian Diabetes Educators Association, Australian Association of Practice Managers, Diversional Therapy Australia and Hearing Aid Audiometrist Society of Australia.

Friends of IAHA

IAHA has an extensive network of sponsors, supporters, stakeholders and colleagues in allied health and Indigenous health.

We share resources, support one another when we can and facilitate and encourage good relationships between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous practitioners in improving Indigenous health and wellbeing outcomes.

Department of Health

dohIndigenous Allied Health Australia is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health. The views expressed on this website do not necessarily represent the position of the Australian Government.

http://www.health.gov.au/

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA)

natsihwaThe National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association (NATSIHWA) is the professional association for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers in Australia. It was established in 2009, following the Australian Government’s announcement of funding to strengthen the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce as part of its ‘Closing the Gap’ initiatives. IAHA and NATSIHWA work together in supporting the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce and building and advocating national health policy to contribute to improving the health and wellbeing of Indigenous Australians.

http://www.natsihwa.org.au/

Services for Australian Rural and Remote Allied Health (SARRAH)

sarrahThe Services for Australian Rural and Remote Allied Health provides advocacy, support and professional development for current and future rural and remote allied health professionals. IAHA and SARRAH work together on advancing the allied health workforce development in meeting the needs of rural and remote allied health professionals.

http://www.sarrah.org.au/

Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association

aidaAIDA is a not-for-profit, non-government organisation dedicated to the pursuit of leadership, partnership & scholarship in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, education and workforce.

AIDA advocates for improvements in Indigenous health in Australia and encourages Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to work in medicine by supporting Indigenous students and doctors. IAHA and AIDA share a national leadership role and work closely on advocating and influencing national health policy, working towards building the Indigenous health workforce as well as sharing visions of improving the health of Indigenous Australians.

http://www.aida.org.au/

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

nacchoThe National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) is the national peak Aboriginal health body representing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services throughout Australia. NACCHO’s work is focussed on:

  • Promoting, developing and expanding the provision of health and wellbeing services through local ACCHSs/AMSs;
  • Liaison with organisations and Governments within both the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal community on health and wellbeing policy and planning issues;
  • Representation and advocacy relating to health service delivery, health information, research, public health, health financing, health programs, etc.; and
  • Fostering cooperative partnerships and working relationships with agencies that respect Aboriginal community control and holistic concepts of health and wellbeing.

NACCHO and IAHA share a national leadership role and work closely on advocating and influencing national health policy, working towards building the Indigenous health workforce as well as sharing visions of improving the health of Indigenous Australians.

http://www.naccho.org.au/

The Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet

Healthinfonet-logoThe Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet is an innovative, national Internet based resource that undertakes translation research to inform practice and policy in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. The HealthInfoNet encourages and supports information-sharing among practitioners, policy-makers and others working to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. Its online yarning places (electronic networks) allow people across the country to share information, knowledge and experience. Based at Edith Cowan University in Perth, the HealthInfoNet is a not-for-profit organisation funded largely by the Australian Government. Its national audience is wide and diverse, including Indigenous community-controlled services and their representative bodies, government agencies, non-government organisations, other health service agencies, health professionals and their associations, researchers and tertiary students. Access to all information on the site is free and available to everyone.

www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au

National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

nrhaThe NRHA’s vision is equivalent health and well-being in rural, regional and remote Australia by the year 2020.

http://nrha.ruralhealth.org.au

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre

AILCAustralia’s only national provider of accredited Indigenous leadership education programs has transformed the lives of more than 1000 graduates since it was established in 2001.

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC) courses unlock opportunities for Indigenous people of all ages to develop their careers and expand the ways they contribute to the community. Culturally-tailored education and training in Indigenous leadership provides participants with the skills and opportunities to realise their potential.

http://ailc.org.au/