Professional Development Workshops

Tuesday 1 December 2015, 1.30pm – 5pm

An Interdisciplinary Approach to Using Motivational Interviewing in an Indigenous Context

This interactive, hands on workshop aims to actively explore Motivational Interviewing (MI) within an international Indigenous context and engage participants with how MI could be utilised across diverse health professions and in their own practice. Our international guest facilitator Dr Kamilla Venner will provide opportunities for participants to practice MI skills, gain an understanding of what MI is, begin to learn how to acquire MI skills, and decide if they would like more formal training in the future.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this workshop, participants will:

  • Have a greater understanding of the Spirit and Definitions of MI
  • Be able to identify the Four Processes of MI
  • Have increased clarity on the difference between MI and styles that are non-MI
  • Have a greater understanding of how MI could be applied in their own professional practice.

Facilitator Dr Kamilla Venner

Kamilla VennerKamilla Venner, Ph.D., is a member of the Athabascan tribe and is an assistant professor of psychology at the University of New Mexico. Her expertise is sought after by researchers around the world who are testing motivational interviewing (MI) with Indigenous populations. Dr Venner’s research with MI began with culturally tailoring MI in partnership with American Indians and this manual is freely available at http://casaa.unm.edu/nami.html. She has conducted a randomized clinical trial to test the effectiveness of MI with American Indians. In addition to research, Dr. Venner has expertise in training providers to use MI. She was a graduate student of William R. Miller, one of the originators of MI. In 2002, Dr Venner became a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT). Since then, she has completed two additional workshops to train supervisors to use MI as they help their supervisees to learn MI. The vast majority of Dr Venner’s MI trainings have concentrated on American Indian/Alaska Native and other indigenous communities interested in this approach. Projects have included improving oral health, decreasing obesity in infants, improving diabetes management and other behavioral health issues such as substance use problems. She enjoys working in partnership with communities and agencies to see how MI may fit best for their clientele.

Thriving rather than surviving: Enhancing resilience through reflective practice

This 3 hour interactive workshop aims to build on participants’ existing knowledge of their own resilience, ways in which they develop and maintain resilience and  explore a model of strengths based reflective practice that will provide a framework in which to consider workplace and community expectations, workloads, stressors and possibilities for self-care.  Reflective practice enables us to maintain a high level of self-awareness from which we can make decisions that support our own well-being and capacity to respond well to work and life challenges.

 Learning Outcomes

At the completion on the workshop, participants will have:

  • Explored definitions of, and approaches to, resilience
  • Considered their own ways of maintaining personal resilience
  • Explored definitions of, and approaches to, strengths based practices
  • Used a model of reflective practice to support resilience
  • Recognised how to utilise strengths-based approaches in reflective practice.

Facilitator Marg Cranney

Marg CranneyMarg Cranney has over 40 years’ expertise in education and training in the areas of educational research, curriculum writing, resource development and training and workshop facilitation. She has worked across education sectors including schools, vocational education and training, adult education, university and private education sectors. Her many and varied roles included teaching, curriculum development, resource development, administration, project management and research at regional, state and national levels. Marg was the principal researcher in the Concept Study Into an Australian Indigenous Leadership Program, a project hosted by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) in 1998 which led to the establishment of the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC). Since that time, Marg has work extensively on the development, facilitation and evaluation of Indigenous leadership courses and training materials. She has also played a significant role in the development of the training materials for the FaHCSIA Indigenous Leadership courses and contributed to the development and delivery of Indigenous leadership programs with the Australian Public Service Commission. Marg’s facilitation skills have been recognised by many organisations and government departments with numerous and regular engagements to facilitate strategic planning workshops, change management exercises and team development processes.

Working cross-culturally and in partnership

Facilitators: Robyn Williams and Kylie Stothers

This 3 hour workshop aims to equip participants with an understanding of skills and knowledge required to work effectively as health professionals in cross-cultural contexts. A crucial part of what we have to do is to decide what our own definition of culture is in our own specific context and how our cultural identity influences and shapes our work practice.  Any culturally safe practice has to be based on shared, negotiated meaning and the development of relationships of trust where the person receiving care is able to experience the service and care as safe on all levels. In Australia, this should encompass all people using health services and with a particular imperative to focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health given the history of colonisation and dispossession.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this workshop the participants will have:

  • Explored challenges and enablers in working across various health settings in diverse cultural contexts
  • Considered cultural safety in the context of cross-cultural relationships and settings
  • Reflected on how health professionals work in partnership in cross-cultural health settings
  • Developed ways forward and actions for putting theory into practice and addressing the current gap in the health workforce.

Robyn Williams bio:

Robyn WilliamsRobyn has nursing and education qualifications and has over thirty five years of experience of working with Indigenous peoples, primarily in the Northern Territory. Her fields of expertise include cross-cultural curriculum development and program implementation; evaluation of community based programs; and qualitative research in Indigenous and remote health issues. She is currently coordinating the Bachelor of Health Science at CDU where she also worked with colleagues to develop a cultural competency framework and a remote health pathway in the Bachelor of Nursing. She works closely with the Chronic Conditions and Remote Health programs in the NT Department of Health and also works collaboratively with the NRHA, AMSANT, IAHA, Centre for Remote Health, Lowitja Institute of Indigenous Health Research, CRANAplus and LIME. Robyn is also undertaking PhD studies where her thesis is on exploring preparation for health professionals to be culturally safe and effective practitioners in Indigenous primary health care settings.

Kylie Stothers Bio:

Kylie StothersKylie Stothers is a mother of two children and she is a Jawoyn woman who was born and raised in Katherine, NT.  Kylie comes from a large extended family with strong ties in Katherine and surrounding communities.  Kylie is a Social Worker and has worked throughout the Northern Territory for over 17 years.  Kylie currently works for the Centre for Remote and Flinders NT at the Katherine site. Kylie’s interest areas are in child and maternal health, working with families, health promotion, child protection and health workforce issues.  Kylie is passionate about education and issues that relate to remote and rural Australia and coordinates a local social work network group, K-Town Social Workers, whose main aim is to keep Katherine region social workers connected and supported whilst practicing in remote NT.

Taking Interprofessional Education to the Next Level: The HealthFusion Team Challenge PRO

Workshop Aim

This fun, immersive and transformative 3 hour workshop aims to provide leading-edge interprofessional education (IPE) while offering participants real life practice in interprofessional team-based problem solving for improved client care.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this workshop the participants will have:

  • Improved knowledge of roles and value of other health professions
  • increased understanding of how IPE contributes to person centred care
  • enhanced attitudes towards working in interprofessional teams.

Facilitator Jane Furnas

Jane FurnasJane Furnas received dual bachelors in Journalism and Arts (Asian Studies) from The University of Queensland in 2010. Ms Furnas speaks Japanese and is also a published journalist with experience in science, health and rural journalism. Ms Furnas joined the HealthFusion team in late 2009, working as Project Manager until 2013 when she commenced her Masters of Occupational Therapy at The University of Queensland. She continues her involvement with the project in 2015 as Project Officer, event facilitator and case study author in a part time capacity.

Wednesday 2 December 2015, 1.30pm – 3pm

Approaching change with clarity: managing the transition well

This 1.5 hour interactive workshop aims to build on participants’ existing knowledge and skills in managing both organisational and everyday life changes at a personal level.  We will examine common types of change, a model for approaching change and strengths based tips for reflecting on and managing change. Participants will use examples from their own lives to consider, analyse and discuss the workshop material.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this workshop the participants will have:

  • Explored definitions of, and approaches to, both  organisational and everyday life changes
  • Considered their own individual ways of managing change
  • Used a change management model to consider a current example from their own lives
  • Enhanced understanding of change and personal change management
  • Increased awareness of how to utilise strengths-based approaches to managing change

Facilitator Marg Cranney

Marg CranneyMarg Cranney has over 40 years’ expertise in education and training in the areas of educational research, curriculum writing, resource development and training and workshop facilitation. She has worked across education sectors including schools, vocational education and training, adult education, university and private education sectors. Her many and varied roles included teaching, curriculum development, resource development, administration, project management and research at regional, state and national levels. Marg was the principal researcher in the Concept Study Into an Australian Indigenous Leadership Program, a project hosted by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) in 1998 which led to the establishment of the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC). Since that time, Marg has work extensively on the development, facilitation and evaluation of Indigenous leadership courses and training materials. She has also played a significant role in the development of the training materials for the FaHCSIA Indigenous Leadership courses and contributed to the development and delivery of Indigenous leadership programs with the Australian Public Service Commission. Marg’s facilitation skills have been recognised by many organisations and government departments with numerous and regular engagements to facilitate strategic planning workshops, change management exercises and team development processes.

Piecing the Puzzle: Understanding ASD in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

This 1.5 hour workshop aims to explore the impact of ASD in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, including cultural considerations in the identification of ASD and subsequent service provision. This workshop will assist participants to gain greater understanding of ASD and how to work with and empower Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with ASD and their families.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion on the workshop, participants will have:

  • increased understanding of ASD, including ‘red flags’, within an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander context
  • greater understanding of the challenges of ASD identification within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations and strengths based approaches to meet these challenges
  • improved clarity around appropriate supports required for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with ASD and how to facilitate access to these support mechanisms
  • increased understanding of how to be culturally responsive to the unique needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with ASD and their families/caregivers.

Facilitator – Dr Josephine Barbaro

Dr Josephine BarbaroDr Josephine Barbaro is Post Doctoral Research Fellow at the Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre at La Trobe University, and the lead clinician in Australia’s first ‘Early Assessment Clinic’ for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Dr Barbaro’s research interests are in the early identification and diagnosis of ASD in infants and toddlers, and family health and well-being following a diagnosis. Her developmental surveillance program for ASD, the Social Attention and Commination Study (SACS), has been translated and disseminated widely, both internationally and internationally, and has had extensive media attention. Dr Barbaro was the recipient of a prestigious Sir Robert Menzies Memorial Scholarship in the Allied Health Sciences, and has won a number of awards, including the International Society for Autism Research Dissertation Award.

 

Facilitator – Yvonne O’Neill

Yvonne O'NeillYvonne O’Neill is an Aboriginal woman from Goodooga NSW. Her mother is Yuwaalaraay/Kamilaroi people and her Dad a Noonghaburra man. Yvonne has worked in different industries but most recently worked in Indigenous Education. Today she works under the Federal Government funding package Helping Children with Autism as one of two Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and families giving opportunities to learn more about autism spectrum disorder and what services are available for support. Yvonne is an accomplished Aboriginal Artist and has artwork hanging in the Vatican Museums in Rome, Italy. She also represented Australia playing Rugby League.

Indigenous Research within Allied Health

This interactive 1.5 hour workshop aims to introduce the idea of undertaking a PhD to participants and prepare Indigenous allied health professionals and students for possible research careers by developing skills, interests and research expertise. The Workshop is aimed at current Indigenous allied health students (undergraduate, honours and post-graduate), allied health professionals with an interest in furthering their career through research and current researchers without a research higher degree who are looking to develop their research skills further. Attendees may not necessarily have considered a research career, however the Workshop may inspire participants to become future researchers.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this workshop the participants will have:

  • Increased appreciation for the challenges of research, the benefits of researching a specific topic and building an evidence base to support theories, policies and programs
  • Explored what is involved in undertaking a PhD, including academic and work experience prior to starting; Your life as a PhD student and the learning journey; Work and PhD study -opportunities and challenges; What does a supervisor do? Australian Postgraduate Awards/Other Scholarships
  • Increase understanding of what a research career entails, including research and contributing to community; Mapping a pathway into a PhD, through a PhD and to career success and leadership within research; Collaborations with national and international researchers; and examples of Post Doctoral opportunities.

 

Workshop content developed by:

Professor Shaun Ewen

Professor Ewen is the Foundation Director of the Melbourne Poche Centre for Indigenous Health in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences. As Foundation Director, Professor Ewen will provide academic leadership to the Centre and maintain a strong sense of Indigenous leadership in the health and higher education sectors. Professor Ewen has held the position of Associate Dean (Indigenous Development) since its inception in 2010. In this role he was charged with working across the faculty to oversee the implementation of the Reconciliation Action Plan. Professor Ewen has a clinical background in physiotherapy, and holds postgraduate qualifications in international relations and education. His area of research expertise relates to Indigenous health and health professional education. Currently he co-leads an Office of Teaching and Learning project investigating how to assess Indigenous health curricula at AQF level 9, and is the recipient of multiple teaching and learning development grants at the University of Melbourne, and the University of British Columbia. Professor Ewen provides the academic and Indigenous leadership for the Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) project, a bi-national project of Medical Deans Australia and New Zealand. He was awarded the School of Population Health Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in 2005. In 2010, he led both the successful Onemda team and the LIME team for the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health in the in the Norman CurryAward, for Innovation and Excellence in Education and Excellence in Knowledge Transfer respectively. In 2011, he was the recipient of the Rio Tinto award for Excellence and Innovation in Indigenous Higher Education.

Warwick Padgham

Warwick PadghamWarwick Padgham is the Senior Project Officer at the Melbourne Poche Centre for Indigenous Health in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences. Warwick’s education includes a Bachelor of Business from La Trobe University, a Post-Graduate Certificate in Professional Ethics from the University of Melbourne, and he is currently undertaking a Master of Public Health. Through his grandmother, Warwick is a descendant of the Taungurong people of central Victoria. Since joining the University of Melbourne in 2012, Warwick has been working on a number of Indigenous health and education related projects, including the development of programs and sup port for Indigenous PhD students, the Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network project, primarily organising the LIME Connection conference, and Billibellary’s Walk: a cultural interpretation of the University of Melbourne’s Parkville campus from an Aboriginal perspective.

An Approach to the Eye

This 1.5 hour interactive workshop aims to familiarise participants with common eye conditions, prepare participants with hands on skills to conduct eye examinations, provide information on appropriate and accurate referral pathways – in both remote and urban environments – to understand eye health language and function of eye equipment for improving eye health. Learning outcomes At the end of the workshops participants will:

  • Be able to identify common eye conditions – what are the signs and symptoms;
  • Be able to conduct basic eye examinations including visual acuity, pupil examinations and basic assessment;
  • Understand referral pathways;
  • Know the “lingo”: how to collect an eye history to talk to eye health professionals;
  • Understand the complexities of working in the eye health environment;
  • Understand equipment, facilities and resources required to improve eye health

Presented by Dr Kristopher Rallah-Baker Dr Kristopher Rallah-BakerDr Kristopher Rallah-Baker is a 35 year old Biri-Gubba-Juru/Warangnu/Yaggera man, descended from the Aboriginal Peoples of North Queensland and Brisbane.  Born in Canberra, Dr Rallah-Baker moved to Brisbane with his family at age 4.  He attended Medical School at the University of Newcastle where he graduated in 2002.  He then undertook his Intern year at the Gold Coast Hospital before returning to Brisbane for his House Officer and Ophthalmology Registrar years. Dr Rallah-Baker will sit his exit exam for Ophthalmology in early 2016, before completing his final year of training (Fellowship year) to become Australia’s first Aboriginal Ophthalmologist.  He has wanted to be an ophthalmologist from early medical school, enjoying not only the operating theatre but also the challenges of internal medicine. Dr Rallah-Baker took up the opportunity to work in the Northern Territory in the position of Outreach Senior Registrar in 2014 to deliver services to rural and remote communities.  Working across Arnhem Land, the Katherine Region and through the area west of Darwin to diagnose and co-ordinate care from within the communities themselves. Currently the Senior Ophthalmology Registrar at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and Lady Cilento Childrens Hospital, Dr Rallah-Baker will present an interactive workshop An Approach to the Eye.

Harness the Power of Twitter

Are you Twitter literate? Do you wonder what the hype is all about? Aimed at those new to Twitter, or those who’d like to use it more effectively, this 1.5hour interactive workshop will give participants an opportunity to explore the benefits of using Twitter to enhance their professional journey and make a difference. Using a strengths-based approach, participants will learn practical tips and tricks to get started with Twitter, engage with new and existing audiences and to communicate messages effectively.

At the end of the workshops participants will have:

  • Explored the role of Twitter in contemporary professional health practice, with a particular focus on advocacy for action on health inequalities and the social determinants of health
  • Identified their purpose for using Twitter and the audience being targeted
  • Gained some practical tips on setting up a Twitter account and using it effectively
  • Greater understanding of the ‘Language of Twitter’ including @mentions, retweets, direct messages, hashtags, favourites, followers, and more.
  • Increased awareness of effective messaging in 140 characters (or less)

Facilitator – Melissa Sweet

Melissa Sweet is an independent journalist, media columnist, author, blogger and enthusiastic Tweeter (@Croakeyblog). She specialises in covering public health matters, with a particular focus on under-served areas and issues. Melissa is founding editor of the social journalism project Croakey, which recently re-launched as a standalone platform – see Croakey.org. She also curates the rotated Twitter account @WePublicHealth (http://croakey.org/wepublichealth/), which is modelled on the successful @IndigenousX account. Melissa has been involved in a number of successful Twitter-mediated crowdfunding projects, including #JustJustice (http://croakey.org/justjustice-tackling-the-over-incarceration-of-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-peoples/) and #WonkyHealth (http://croakey.org/31198-2/). For the past two years, Croakey has hosted the successful #IHMayDay – standing for Indigenous Health MayDay – which provides a full-day programming with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people tweeting about Indigenous health issues. This event is led by Dr Lynore Geia from James Cook University and this year Summer May Finlay also assisted with its moderation (http://croakey.org/about-ihmayday/). Melissa is involved in supporting other new media innovation through her role as a founding member of the Public Interest Journalism Foundation. Melissa is a PhD candidate at the University of Canberra, and also has an honorary appointment as Adjunct Senior Lecturer in the Sydney School of Public Health at the University of Sydney.