IAHA Media Release – Close the Gap: Allied Health Standing Strong 10 years on

Download the IAHA Media Release- Close the Gap: Allied Health Standing Strong 10 years on here

Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) is an active member of the steering group of The Close the Gap Campaign, which is now in its 10th year and led by a coalition of more than 40 Indigenous and non-Indigenous health and community organisations committed to achieving health equality by 2030.

On National Close the Gap Day, 17 March 2016, it is important to celebrate the strengths of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, families, communities and organisations who work toward improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

“IAHA contributes  to improving the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and influences generational change through strong national allied health leadership; supporting the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce; building a culturally responsive workforce; providing advocacy; and establishing partnerships and support across the multiple sectors that influence health and wellbeing,” said Donna Murray, IAHA CEO.

“Achieving equality in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing outcomes will take commitment and collaboration beyond just the health sector,” said Dr Faye McMillan, IAHA Chairperson. “Given that allied health professionals work across a diverse range of settings within the health, education, justice and community sectors, they are well placed to lead the way in improving access to services and really make a positive impact on the lives of individuals and families.”

“IAHA has long acknowledged the value of interprofessional approaches to healthcare and is committed to improving health system effectiveness,” said Dr McMillan. “Valuing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures as a strength will better meet the needs our people. The complex interplay between social, economic, cultural determinants impacting on health means that a comprehensive and culturally responsive approach is required if we wish to achieve health equality by 2030.”

“It is also important to acknowledge the contributions of our other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous partners as they work with us to build cultural capabilities to provide culturally safe and responsive care that is acceptable to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples,” said Dr McMillan. “It will be our combined efforts that can propel our nation forward to Close the Gap by 2030.”

Join us today in demanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health equality within a generation. Sign the pledge to Close the Gap.

 

Media Contact:

Hayley McQuire, Research and Policy Officer

(02) 6285 1010

17 March 2016

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