Early Life: Shaping Children’s Brain Development

Early brain development and life experiences during childhood, may hold the key to future health and well-being outcomes.

About this Event

Early Life: Shaping Children’s Brain Development

Introducing the first in a four part webcast series of Jumbunna Sessions focusing on social, emotional health and well-being for Aboriginal children, families and communities, underpinned by NSW Health’s First 2000 days Framework.

Early life experiences and the environment in which children live, grow and play have the potential to influence their developmental health and later health and disease outcomes.

Babies aren’t a ‘clean slate’ at birth; their epigenome and brain are highly responsive to the world around them, shaped by genetics, in-utero experiences, care from their parents, and their families world.

These influences on early brain development are important, impacting on a child’s lifetime physical, cognitive, emotional, social and physical health and well-being.

Join the panel discussion as we explore early brain development, and culturally sensitive approaches to support and promote infant and early childhood developmental outcomes.

THE JUMBUNNA SESSIONS ARE FOR YOU IF:

You currently work with Aboriginal families and communities, or are interested in learning more about how you can support positive health outcomes for our Aboriginal communities.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

• Describe the vital importance of early brain development

• Discuss the influence of early life experiences on developmental health

• Develop culturally sensitive approaches to support and promote infant developmental outcomes

PANEL MEMBERS:

Megan Bell – Aboriginal Liaison Officer , Aboriginal Health Services, Northern Sydney LHD.

Vicki Laing – CNS, GP Community Liaison Nurse, Child Youth and Family Health Service, Northern Sydney LHD.

Jenny McDonald – CNC Quality and Data, Child Youth and Family Health Service, Northern Sydney LHD.

Other speakers to be announced.

CONTACT:

E. HETI-TSUadmin@health.nsw.gov.au

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