Media Release IAHA finding new ways to support the health workforce – the centrality of culture


Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA), the peak organisation for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health workforce, is committed to supporting the wellbeing and continued growth of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce through the COVID19 pandemic.

The COVID19 Pandemic is not only a healthcare concern for the community, but also for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce and health students who are in frontline services, essential services and support roles.

Donna Murray, CEO of IAHA said “the health and wellbeing of IAHA members, the broader national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health workforce and the emerging health workforce is a priority. We are working collaboratively to develop new ways of providing supports like a webinar series for professional and personal care.”  

IAHA, over the coming weeks, will be hosting the first series of five webinars for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health membership of IAHA and our partners, the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association, the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives and the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association. With a focus on self-care, this will provide a place to connect and support self-care strategies for our valuable and important members. These webinars have been developed in collaboration with the NSW Rural Doctors Network utilising their new Rural Health Pro Platform.

On Thursday 23 April, IAHA will deliver the first in the self-care series, “Distant Spiritual Healing” with Tony Duwun Lee and Trent Bundirrik Lee, Larrakia and Karrijari healers from Darwin.  Of the event, Tony Duwun Lee said, “stress puts our health at risk. We are passionate about the mob on the frontline and want to give the Aboriginal health workforce strategies to manage their stress. Stress increases those hormones such as cortisol and adrenalin and we have spiritual ways of healing stress, that we want to share.”

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ways of knowing, being and doing keep us connected, and stronger together and providing the opportunity in this format is new.  This is an example of the central role of culture in maintaining and promoting good health and wellbeing.

IAHA Chairperson, Nicole Turner said, “for IAHA and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, healing plays an important role in a holistic health and wellbeing perspective. IAHA were fortunate enough to have Tony Duwun Lee and Trent Bundirrik Lee at the 2019 IAHA National Conference, which was highly valued by members, and for this relationship to enable us to deliver this session at this time is very special”.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce and future workforce is critical to the Australian health system in servicing and supporting all Australians. They are the backbone of our communities and are providing high quality, professional and culturally safe care. IAHA is very proud to support our members and celebrate the work that they do and highly value the experience and wisdom they bring to the health system, communities and families.

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Enquiries:

Tanja Hirvonen

P: (02) 6285 1010
E: tanja@iaha.com.au


April 23, 2020

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Posted by: Charlie